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Leadership Tuesdays -- Developing Women Leaders
Ursula Burns Discusses Impatience and Leadership at Catalyst Awards Luncheon
By Melissa J. Anderson (New York City)
At last week’s Catalyst Awards Conference, lunch keynote Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, shared her experience and advice on leadership and more. “I lucked out,” she began. “Xerox is a company that fit me well. It allowed to relax into my own self.”
Having begun her career as an engineer, Burns climbed the corporate ranks all the way to the top, becoming the first Black woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company in 2009. “There was an unbelievable roar and uproar about that,” she recalled. “But the board expected that, and I expected it, and our PR people expected it and prepared me for it.”
But what surprised Burns and the rest of Xerox was the conversation about her transition – how she was appointed CEO by another woman, Anne Mulcahy. “The two together really took on an entire conversation. Anne and I refused to 
By Melissa J. Anderson (New York City)
At last week’s Catalyst Awards Conference, lunch keynote Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, shared her experience and advice on leadership and more. “I lucked out,” she began. “Xerox is a company that fit me well. It allowed to relax into my own self.”
Having begun her career as an engineer, Burns climbed the corporate ranks all the way to the top, becoming the first Black woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company in 2009. “There was an unbelievable roar and uproar about that,” she recalled. “But the board expected that, and I expected it, and our PR people expected it and prepared me for it.”
But what surprised Burns and the rest of Xerox was the conversation about her transition – how she was appointed CEO by another woman, Anne Mulcahy. “The two together really took on an entire conversation. Anne and I refused to 
At last week’s Catalyst Awards Conference, lunch keynote Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, shared her experience and advice on leadership and more. “I lucked out,” she began. “Xerox is a company that fit me well. It allowed to relax into my own self.”
Having begun her career as an engineer, Burns climbed the corporate ranks all the way to the top, becoming the first Black woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company in 2009. “There was an unbelievable roar and uproar about that,” she recalled. “But the board expected that, and I expected it, and our PR people expected it and prepared me for it.”
But what surprised Burns and the rest of Xerox was the conversation about her transition – how she was appointed CEO by another woman, Anne Mulcahy. “The two together really took on an entire conversation. Anne and I refused to 
By Melissa J. Anderson (New York City)
At last week’s Catalyst Awards Conference, lunch keynote Ursula Burns, CEO of Xerox, shared her experience and advice on leadership and more. “I lucked out,” she began. “Xerox is a company that fit me well. It allowed to relax into my own self.”

Having begun her career as an engineer, Burns climbed the corporate ranks all the way to the top, becoming the first Black woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company in 2009. “There was an unbelievable roar and uproar about that,” she recalled. “But the board expected that, and I expected it, and our PR people expected it and prepared me for it.”

But what surprised Burns and the rest of Xerox was the conversation about her transition – how she was appointed CEO by another woman, Anne Mulcahy. “The two together really took on an entire conversation. Anne and I refused to do an interview together at first. The only time we did it was at the Fortune Most Powerful Woman conference. We stayed away from that conversation.”

In fact, she continued, all the media hubbub was discomfiting for her initially. “I found out people liked me, respected me, thought I was smart – without ever knowing me. I became the most smart, most famous, most beautiful person… but at that point I hadn’t even done anything!”

Now, almost four years into her job, she’s easing into the public eye as she’s shown her skill as a CEO. “Now it’s more normal to [position] me as a leader,” she explained, “not having the spotlight on me as an oddity.”

Throughout her talk with Catalyst CEO Ilene Lang, Burns discussed her career path, joking... 

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April 16, 2013


Today, Leadership Tuesdays' is sharing an article by John Maxwell, a best-selling author and highly regarded leadership expert.  John has written over 70 books and is a sought-after speaker for Fortune 500 companies, international government leaders, church leaders, and organizations as diverse as the United States Military Academy at West Point and the National Football League. Recently, he posted an article that I believe will speaks to most of us.  "LEADING FROM THE MIDDLE OF THE PACK" is the situation that most employees and workers face on a daily basis.  In this article, he shares helpful insight on how one can be a successful even if their title is not CEO.


Leading From The Middle Of The Pack
by The John Maxwell Company

Leadership is a choice you make rather than a place you sit. In other words, leadership comes from influence and not from your position. For this reason, even when you’re not in front, you’re still leading those around you. In fact, you are even influencing those ahead of you. In this lesson, I’d like to look at four models of how followers influence those above them in the chain of command.Four Models of Leading from the Middle of the Pack

1) The Backseat Driver

Have you ever had the misfortune of transporting a backseat driver in your car? Talk about annoying! Backseat drivers specialize in providing unwanted input. They ceaselessly provide directions, acting like a human GPS—only without a “mute” button. They gladly point out shortcuts that the driver missed or parking spots that she failed to notice. 

The problem with backseat drivers isn’t that they provide misinformation, but that they do not have...

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